new exhibitions
NORTHERN GALLERY FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

At National Glass Centre, Liberty Way, Sunderland SR6 0GL
0191 515 5555

northerngalleryforcontemporaryart.co.uk
ngca@sunderland.ac.uk

10.00 - 17.00

10 min walk from St Peter's Metro 20 min walk from Sunderland Station


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JOHN KIPPIN : ROMANITAS
May 19 - Jun 24, 2018
“...we're going to build an entirely new political movement...an economic nationalist movement...[with] a trillion-dollar infrastructure plan...We're just going to throw it up against the wall and see if it sticks. It will be as
exciting as the 1930s..." Steve Bannon, Chief Strategist to president-elect Trump, November 2016
 
In Romanitas, Kippin reflects upon both the state of contemporary politics, in relation to that what WH Auden called the “low, dishonest decade” of the 1930s. In Romanitas Kippin dwells on the image of the future built by a far-right nationalist regime that still exists, to picture the daily life lived amongst it. The work can be read as a kind of portrait of Europe in our time. Kippin’s starting point in creating the work was Winston Churchill’s famous phrase: “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us”.
press release

DAN HOLDSWORTH: CONTINUOUS TOPOGRAPHY
Oct 26, 2018 - Jan 6, 2019
Since 1996, the English artist-photographer Dan Holdsworth has explored the “extreme” territories that characterize humans’ changing relationship to the ‘natural’ world in the Anthropocene. Since 2012, the artist has worked alongside academic geologists to map the exact contours of Alpine glaciers and rock formations, by using drones, lasers, photography, and high-end software ordinarily employed by the military and climate scientists. The result is the series Continuous Topography, consisting of images created from millions of points marked in space, each a millimetre-perfect registration of the precise contours of a rapidly changing landscape. This landscape is the Argientière glacier in the Alps. Indeed between the recording of the landscape, and its presentation as artworks made to be conserved in perpetuity, the landscape has already begun to change beyond recognition.
press release

DAN HOLDSWORTH: SPATIAL OBJECTS
Jan 18 - Mar 17, 2019
Private view Thu Jan 17 6pm - 8pm
Holdsworth’s Spatial Objects are strange, alluring portraits of the ‘objects' that every one of us encounters every day, and which are the building blocks of vision in a digital age, but which ordinarily lie beyond our perception. The titular ‘objects’ are single “data points” – pixels marking a unique point in space, as GPS co-ordinates. The starting point for these works has been geological mapping data from the US Geological Survey of Crater Lake, a protected National Park in the western United States. When transformed into a 3D model, the data allows us to see every single point in the landscape in virtual space. Holdsworth has created photographs of individual pixels, blown-up to a scale that they become possessed of a monumental physicality. In each work, we encounter the edges of an individual plane of one pixel: each image shows only “a fragment of a fragment” of the landscape, in the artist’s own words. Here, we experience the space of nature just as it is mediated through our omnipresent screens – as pure RGB colour and light.
press release

Click to enlargeDAN HOLDSWORTH : SPATIAL OBJECTS
Jan 18 - Mar 17, 2019
Private view Thu Jan 17 6pm - 8pm
Holdsworth’s Spatial Objects are strange, alluring portraits of the ‘objects‘ that every one of us encounters every day, and which are the building blocks of vision in a digital age, but which ordinarily lie beyond our perception.
The title Spatial Objects derives from a term in computer programming to designate objects that exist, as Holdsworth notes, “in simultaneous symmetry within the virtual and the real”. These works are paradoxical objects, making virtual space powerfully present, and representing ‘real’, natural spaces through almost completely abstract imagery. Pixels, Holdsworth notes, are the basic building blocks of all digital communication.
 
The project is accompanied by both a 122pp catalogue entitled Spatial Objects, along with a major 280pp monograph surveying Holdsworth’s career published by Hatje Cantz, entitled Mapping the Limits of Space.

KELLY RICHARDSON: PILLARS OF DAWN
Mar 29 - May 26, 2019
Artist Kelly Richardson has spent three years imagining a world at one remove from our own, working with digital imaging software to create a vision of the near future. In each of her works, we encounter millions of glistening crystals that have somehow encrusted every square inch of the planet’s surface. The artist pushes the limits of what our eyes can register, the mind can conceive of, and the most high-tech computers can calculate. Each crystal has been ‘sculpted’ in three dimensions, so that in each work, there is one crystal for every extant species on Earth. ‘Pillars of Dawn’ presents us with what seems to be the dusk of humanity ̶ the sixth great extinction ̶ where only the hardiest of trees seem to survive. These are akin to photographs outside of time: from either the Earth’s earliest days or humanity’s final hour, acting as documents of nuclear conflagration or environmental depredation.

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